And now Klaus is apparently running off to go and save Sunny. In the books of course it is Violet, but I know that Hollywood prefers its female actresses to do very little.
—  

Lemony Snicket, A Series of Unfortunate Events audio commentary (via literatureloveaffair)

genderhaunt

(via thechosenneville)

2 hours ago · 13,851 notes · Source · Reblogged from dreamsoffools

bluefull:

Work in progress

bluefull:

Work in progress

18 hours ago · 945 notes · Source · Reblogged from pixel-nymph

vjeranski:

Ivan Aivazovsky - Among the Waves

vjeranski:

Ivan Aivazovsky - Among the Waves

18 hours ago · 2,720 notes · Source · Reblogged from yusnishinoya

pensacosi:

How to make comics

My first vine

18 hours ago · 47,358 notes · Source · Reblogged from pixel-nymph

mickeyandcompany:

More details about Disney’s Moana

Walt Disney Animation Studios revealed plans today for Moana, a sweeping, CG-animated comedy-adventure about a spirited teenager on an impossible mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest. In theaters in late 2016, the film is directed by the renowned filmmaking team of Ron Clements and John Musker (The Little Mermaid, The Princess and the Frog, Aladdin).
In the ancient South Pacific world of Oceania, Moana, a born navigator, sets sail in search of a fabled island. During her incredible journey, she teams up with her hero, the legendary demi-god Maui, to traverse the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous sea creatures, breathtaking underworlds and ancient folklore.
“John and I have partnered on so many films—from The Little Mermaid to Aladdin to The Princess and the Frog,” said Clements. “Creating Moana is one of the great thrills of our career. It’s a big adventure set in this beautiful world of Oceania.”
“Moana is indomitable, passionate and a dreamer with a unique connection to the ocean itself,” Musker said. “She’s the kind of character we all root for, and we can’t wait to introduce her to audiences.”
(Source: D23)

mickeyandcompany:

More details about Disney’s Moana

Walt Disney Animation Studios revealed plans today for Moana, a sweeping, CG-animated comedy-adventure about a spirited teenager on an impossible mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest. In theaters in late 2016, the film is directed by the renowned filmmaking team of Ron Clements and John Musker (The Little Mermaid, The Princess and the Frog, Aladdin).

In the ancient South Pacific world of Oceania, Moana, a born navigator, sets sail in search of a fabled island. During her incredible journey, she teams up with her hero, the legendary demi-god Maui, to traverse the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous sea creatures, breathtaking underworlds and ancient folklore.

“John and I have partnered on so many films—from The Little Mermaid to Aladdin to The Princess and the Frog,” said Clements. “Creating Moana is one of the great thrills of our career. It’s a big adventure set in this beautiful world of Oceania.”

“Moana is indomitable, passionate and a dreamer with a unique connection to the ocean itself,” Musker said. “She’s the kind of character we all root for, and we can’t wait to introduce her to audiences.”

(Source: D23)

18 hours ago · 15,058 notes · Source · Reblogged from maura-labingi

18 hours ago · 7,980 notes · Source · Reblogged from bisouette

Reblog if you’ve ever been to a RYLA camp, <33

18 hours ago · 37 notes · Reblogged from anoccupationalhazard

mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]

00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.

Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.

I need this like burning.

19 hours ago · 4,772 notes · Source · Reblogged from bevsi

20 hours ago · 2,366 notes · Source · Reblogged from hazy-serein

20 hours ago · 74,156 notes · Source · Reblogged from pixel-nymph